Welcoming Suzhou ACM-W Professional Chapter

Top Row: Yilin Pan (Chapter Member), Haiyang Zhang (Membership Chair), Yunzhe Wang (Secretary); Middle Row: Lin Lin (Treasurer), Jia Wang (Vice Chair), Feng Cheng (Chapter Member);  Bottom Row:, Yao Lyu (Chapter Member), Qian Zhen (Chapter Member), Nan Xiang (Chair)

As we celebrate the establishment of the new ACM-W professional chapter, we are all  thrilled to envision what lies ahead for the founders and members in the coming year. The Vice Chair Jia Wang (Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University) reflects, “This new chapter not only symbolizes a fresh beginning but also presents a platform for growth, learning, and empowerment within our community”.

The Chair Nan Xiang (Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University) considers ACM-W is an amazing platform that supports the development of women in computing. Throughout his career, he has worked with many outstanding women whose talents have often left me in awe. He believes that with the platform provided by the chapter, the chapter has the opportunity and responsibility to offer more help and support to women. He also believes the chapter will be instrumental in promoting the interaction among local researchers and building a bridge between researchers in Suzhou and those around the world. 

The chapter brings together a capable and enthusiastic team from different universities. Both Membership Chair, Haiyang Zhang (Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University) and Lin Lin (Tsinghua University), who will be serving the chapter as the treasurer, expressed that they are honored to be part of an organization that champions the advancement and representation of women in the field of computer science. 

This is indeed truly an exciting time for their chapter members. The chapter members can look forward to a year of cultivating a supportive environment where all members can thrive. Yunzhe Wang (Suzhou University of Science and Technology), is the chapter’s secretary, and explained they are dedicated to empowering women in tech through mentorship, diversity, and community building. This year, members can look forward to engaging events, workshops, hackathons, structured mentorship programs, and numerous networking opportunities. The chapter will also host guest speakers and panel discussions, fostering professional development and collaboration. Qian Zhen, a Chapter Member from Suzhou University of Science and Technology, said: “ We will work on creating a supportive community and advancing professional growth.”

Their collective efforts will surely advance the cause of women in computing, fostering inclusivity and innovation. The chapter is also eager to collaborate on projects that challenge them to make a significant impact in the field and their professional lives. 

We wish them success in their new journey!

Starting an ACM-W Professional Chapter 

By Bettina Bair

On November 6, 2023, the Central Ohio ACM-W Professional Chapter was officially chartered by ACM’s Chief Operating Officer, becoming the third active ACM-W Professional Chapter in the United States. There are 16 active ACM-W Professional Chapters worldwide. Our chapter has close ties with the NW Ohio ACM-W, OCWiC ACM-W, and two ACM-W Student Chapters in Central Ohio.

All of us in the Central Ohio ACM-W Professional Chapter (nicknamed 614ACMW) are thrilled to be welcomed into the ACM-W global network of professional women in computing.  Since we just went through our chartering process, I thought I would share some of the strategies we found to be helpful. 

Would you like to start an ACM-W Professional Chapter?  Here’s how.

To start with, the requirements to start an ACM-W professional chapter are simple: 3 officers, 7 members, and contact information (chapter name, address, email, phone).  It does take some time, though, so we’re here to break it down into steps. 

Step 0. Develop a Value Statement.

When you are looking for officers and members, people will want to know why they should be involved.  And also, why ACM-W and not some other unaffiliated club?  It really helps to write down your value statement so that you can be confident and clear when you answer these questions. 

Amanda and I developed this list of ACM-W Professional Chapter benefits, and we share it at meetings. You can also use the list ACM published: Professional Chapter Resources and Benefits.

  • ACM-W advocates, supports, and celebrates women in computing.  Chapters provide an environment for members to make professional and social connections, learn about technology, get career advice, participate in mentoring, organize events, and provide community service. 
  • ACM-W is a globally respected professional association. There are hundreds of chapters worldwide with 70k+ members.
  • ACM-W Professional Chapters have access to ACM’s Distinguished Speaker list. ACM will cover the cost of sending any of these speakers to your chapter event. Chapters get free web hosting.  Professional Chapter members get access to many ACM publications with tech news, career announcements, conferences, and more.  ACM-W Chapters can connect with other chapters via the ACM-W Buddy project and ACM-W Celebrations.  ACM-W Professional Chapter members come from industry, non-profits, start-ups, and academia. 

You may develop additional benefits or member requirements for your chapter. Every local community is different.  As long as your priority is advocating, supporting, and celebrating women in computing, you are doing it right. 

Step 1. Find Officers. 

Since you will be the chair, you really only need to find two more people to be officers. You should look for people with leadership experience who are also friendly, responsive, and enthusiastic.  All your chapter officers need to be paying ACM members

Here are some places I looked for chapter officers: colleagues, best friends, co-authors, former ACM-W student chapter officers, ACM-W Celebration event sponsors, speakers, and organizers. I looked at hackathon programs and company organization charts. Ultimately, Facebook and LinkedIn proved to be the most useful. Using a filtered search, I was able to generate a list of women I knew who were working or living in my city. 

Amanda Kauppila and Bettina Bair

Very soon after, I made contact with Amanda Kauppila, who would become our chapter’s vice chair (Hi Amanda!). Amanda had been an officer of her ACM-W Student Chapter, so she was a perfect person to step into an officer position in an ACM-W Professional Chapter. 

Step 2. Recruit Members.

You need ten members in total. Your officers count as part of that minimum number. And your non-officer members do not need to be ACM members. ACM-W Professional Chapter members can be women, men, non-binary, academic, and industry technology professionals at all levels. You can be selective, but ACM-W encourages professional chapters to have diversity in their membership.  In particular, members should be from multiple employers and include academic as well as industry organizations

So, Amanda and I needed to find eight more members. To find interested people, you should organize a recruiting event. You can also contact people individually and invite them to become members, but a recruiting event can establish your chapter as a welcoming place.

Our first recruiting event was a tech talk headlined by a rockstar professor from Ohio State University, Dr Tanya Berger-Wolf.  Tanya is a popular speaker with cross-disciplinary research that touches on AI, big data, and biodiversity conservation.  (Hi Tanya!)

We reserved a meeting room at our local library and advertised the event on Meetup, Facebook, and LinkedIn.  Again, LinkedIn proved to be the best media channel to connect with local women in computing.

After Tanya’s talk, Amanda and I did a presentation about our intention to create an ACM-W Professional Chapter.  Tanya volunteered to be our third officer, and we signed up four new members. 

Step 3. Build Critical Mass. 

After your first recruiting event, you may still not have enough members to apply for an ACM-W Professional Chapter charter. We didn’t.  But Amanda and I felt that the success of that first meeting – having Tanya sign up to be our Treasurer and getting four members – was a vote of confidence, and it motivated us to carry on. 

Amanda and I realized that we needed to build an online presence where we could show who we were and what our chapter was about. So we set about creating a website and social media groups where we could host more community-building activities. Amanda started talking to people about being speakers at future meetings. 

In effect, we started acting like we were already a chartered ACM-W Professional Chapter.  Believing in ourselves helped others believe in us. And slowly, one at a time, we added members. 

Step 4. Check on Details. 

When you have three officers and ten members, you are *almost* ready to submit your application for an ACM Professional Chapter charter.  Here are a few additional required details you should have handy. 

  • Chapter Name – Your chapter’s official name must be “City-name” ACM-W Professional Chapter unless the city-name is not unique.  There are 23 cities named Columbus in the U.S., so we were able to get an exception to call our chapter the “Central Ohio” ACM-W Professional Chapter.
  • Chapter Mailing Address – Your chapter can request promotional material from ACM, so you need to have a shipping address.
  • Chapter Email Address – This should be a unique email address, not the same as any ACM or ACM-W member. 
  • Chapter Phone Number – I’m not sure why this is needed, but it’s a required field. 
  • Chapter Type and SubType – “Professional” and “ACM-W”
  • Officer ACM Member IDs – The form will ask you for the member IDs, not the names.  You can’t look up the ID, so you should get it from your officers.  You will designate one person each for Chair, Vice-Chair, and Treasurer.
  • Email List Name – ACM will create two listservs for your chapter: one for officers and one for members.  You can make up your own name but it has to start with a letter, be 10 characters or less, and only alphanumeric, without spaces or periods. Dashes and underscores are permitted.
  • Member Names, Email, Affiliation – You need first name, last name, email, and affiliation (company). Or an ACM member ID.  You can enter these one at a time or upload a CSV file with this layout: Last Name, First Name, E-mail, Affiliation (not ACM). 

I know that sounds like a lot, but it’s really just a few small things that are very specific. 

5. Submit! And Next Steps.

When you click “Submit” on your ACM-W Professional Chapter application,  your chapter will begin its formal approval journey.  This is very exciting, and you should definitely celebrate.  Whatever happens next, you have done a great job assembling a small community of smart and motivated women in computing. 

Initially, you will get an email from the ACM local activities chair to let you know that the process has started and to advise you that there might be a one or two-week wait for a final decision on your application.  

At this point, I recommend that you reach out to the people who will approve your application, introduce yourself, and give them an opportunity to learn more about your chapter. Here are the people you should contact:

local_activities@hq.acm.org – This person can help you fix any problems with your application and will also be able to ensure that your chapter gets the ACM resources that are available to you.

ACM-W Professional Chapter Chair  – all chapter applications are approved by the ACM-W Professional Chapter chair. Let her know that your group is applying for a charter and see if there are other chapters or activities happening in your area. 

Regional Chair – If your chapter is in India, Europe, or North America, it will be a part of a larger geographic regional group.  Contact the regional chair and let them know that you are interested in being a part of their community.

Pretty soon, you will get that special email from the Local Activities chair letting you know that your chapter has been welcomed as a member of the ACM-W global community of women in computing. 

What will your chapter do next?  Here are 101 ideas

Conclusion.

Congratulations on taking the first step to starting your own ACM-W Professional Chapter! I hope this guide has been helpful. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me or to the ACM-W staff.

I wish you all the best in your chapter’s journey!

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter

Nine Tips for Growth and Maintenance

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters.

This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send many Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to most of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

The Ohio State University ACM-W Student Chapter at the Grace Hopper Celebration

The Ohio State ACM-W Student Chapter has developed nine tips which they use to grow and maintain their chapter. These tips range from having a Mission Statement to Member Recruiting and Fundraising.

In this series of videos you can learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders. Each link below will take you to a page that has a short video and discussion about the tip that is being presented.

  1. Mission Statement – Explain why your ACM-W Student Chapter exists and how it will function.
  2. Goal Setting – Having goals ensures that you stay on track while you plan for future growth.
  3. Executive Board – You can’t do it alone. Also, it’s no fun trying to!
  4. Event Planning – How to connect with your community and keep members coming back.
  5. Member Recruiting – Build a cohesive brand through flyers, posters and online communication
  6. Funding – You can run your chapter for free, but companies and schools can often help with expenses.
  7. Company Relationships – Company partnerships are beneficial to you and them.
  8. Community Involvement – Look for fun activities that help your members bond with their community and give back.
  9. Sustainability – Always be thinking of ways to make it easier for next year’s members.

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 9. Sustainability

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Officer, Courtney, talks about the importance of planning for the continued success of your club. She says that the key is to make it is easy for your incoming officers to find the resources they need. Transparency is key. One thing she recommends is having a single location, like a google drive, to store all your meeting minutes, archived communication and contact lists.

What is your chapter doing to help the next year’s officers to be successful? Do you have a shared drive or repository for your worksheets and letters? What other things could you do to make sure that your chapter continues to serve your school’s women in computing community?

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This is the last article in the series. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 8. Community Involvement

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Officer, Vicky, talks about the importance of engaging with your campus and community with your club. She says that this is a great way to create shared experiences among the members of your organization. She shares some of the things that the Ohio State University ACM-W Student Chapter has done. For example, they have hosted coding workshops at local middle schools and volunteered at the Center of Science and Industry in Columbus, Ohio.

Has your chapter ever done a coding event with a local school? How did it go? What kinds of outreach activities are possible in your area?

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 7. Company Relationships

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Officer, Amy, talks about building relationships with company partners. She explains that companies benefit from having a partnership with your ACM-W student chapter, so the relationship is beneficial to you and them both. One way to get started is to invite recruiters to give a tech talk, resume review or career planning workshop. If the first session is a success you can invite them back the following year and ask them to provide swag or food sponsorship.

When you are looking at companies, don’t feel like you need to just talk to the major tech firms like Microsoft and Apple. Remember that IT is a part of every company. In Columbus, there are many insurance companies that hire many CSE students every year.

And remember to reach out to your alumni members. They are often working with companies that would make good partners. They may want to come back to your chapter and do an event.

What companies are in your area? Does your school do a job fair? Have you ever invited a recruiter to talk to your chapter? Can you think of reasons why a company would want to partner with your ACM-W Student Chapter?

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 6. Funding

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Officer, Mary Catherine, talks about how to raise funds for your chapter’s activities. As Mary Catherine says, you can totally run your chapter for free. If you have a few members, your goals might be modest: to have regular meetings and occasional faculty-led tech talks. But if you want to grow your chapter, it really helps to have financial support.

Often your school will have a group that helps student clubs. They might have places for you to meet, to make copies of your posters, and they might have drinks and snacks. They may even have small grants that you can apply for.

Mary Catherine says your school may also have a diversity and inclusion committee that can connect your group with funding resources.

One of the best ways to get support is to develop relationships with companies. For example, when you invite them to talk to your members about careers, ask if they can provide refreshments. Once you have some history and trust, you can ask for bigger donations, to help send a group of members to a conference, for example.

Most importantly, don’t be afraid to ask for donations. All of these organizations have been asked for funding many times. They won’t be surprised to get an ask from you. And even if they can’t help you themselves, they can often put you in touch with someone who can.

What has your chapter done to raise funds? Have you ever had a bake sale or pet wash or other kind of fundraiser? What was something that you found surprising or interesting about asking people for money?

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 5. Member Recruiting

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Officer, Vicky talks about recruitment and advertising. She says that advertising your club is an ongoing effort that helps recruit members and creates a recognizable brand for your organization. While the ACM-W OSU chapter uses many traditional approaches, like posters, flyers and emails, they also make personal appearances in classrooms. Every semester, chapter officers visit incoming CSE majors in their classes to tell them about ACM-W and invite them to attend the first meeting. Vicky talks about the chapter’s weekly emails that advertise upcoming events, and she recommends using the Mailchimp app to manage these promotions. She also recommends using Canva to develop a consistent look for your posters and emails.

What have you done to encourage students to attend your meetings? What worked well for you and what didn’t? Does your club have a logo or mascot that you use consistently on your posters? Did you know that you can use ACM-W branded graphics for free? Check it out.

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 4. Event Planning

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Officer, Laura, talks about planning effective events for your club. She says that the best way to grow your club and your community is through events. Consider hosting a back-to-school social at the start of the semester, tech talks with professors, and networking events with company recruiters. To plan your event, think about these three event basics: your venue, menu and calendar.

Venue: The size of your room should reflect your expectations about the number of attendees.

Calendar: Having consistent regular events (weekly, monthly, etc) will help your members plan ahead to attend. If your club is new, you may only have a few meetings a semester.

Menu: Students like food, so try to have something for them. Check with your school to see if they have funding that can be used to provide drinks and snacks. Or, if you are hosting a session for a company recruiter, see if they can provide refreshments.

Does your chapter have regular meetings? Where do you meet and how often? What kinds of snacks do your members like?

Looking for ideas for ACM-W Student Chapter events? ACM has sixty-two suggestions for you!

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 3. Exec Board

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Officer, Amy, explains the importance of Finding Executive Board Members for your club. The ACM only requires that you have a president, vice president to start a chapter. Amy explains that you can (and should) have many other executive board members. The exec board is the heart of your club. Some positions to consider are treasurer, event coordinator, media coordinator, website manager , community outreach and company liaison. Some positions may be strategic, like funding or sponsorship development to help support activities in the following years. Think about your exec board as being an extension of your ACM-W mission to support, celebrate and advocate for women in computing. The student chapter officers should have positions that help them grow while helping your club grow as well.

What officer positions does your chapter have? How did you find people to lead your chapter?

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 2. Goals

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters. This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, tech talks, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Co-President, Courtney explains the importance of Setting Goals for your club. She advises you to create two lists of goals: practical and aspirational. Dream goals will help your club visualize its future and give direction to your day-to-day operations. Having big dreams allows you to recognize opportunities when they present themselves. Your ACM-W Student Chapter should pick a few achievable goals for your first year. Accomplishing these small steps will give you the energy to take on incrementally greater things later. For example, you might set a goal to have one tech talk and one social per semester in your first year. Next year you might set a goal to have one more event. Build on your successes!

Does your chapter have formal written goals? Are they tactical or strategic? How are you planning to accomplish them? What’s your chapter’s dream goal? And how does it help drive your club’s activities?

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability

Build Your ACM-W Student Chapter: 1. Mission

The Ohio State University Student Chapter of the ACM-W was chartered on May 13, 2003 and is one of the oldest continuously operating ACM-W Student Chapters.

This chapter annually hosts 40+ events that include trips to the Grace Hopper Celebration, the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing, company visits, socials, and workshops. They have around 50 active members, and they serve a total community of about 200 students. They often send more than 50 Ohio State students to the Grace Hopper Celebration, and can provide financial support for travel and registration costs to 35 of these through chapter fundraising efforts.

Learn how to build, maintain and grow a strong ACM-W chapter from The Ohio State’s ACM-W Chapter Leaders.

In this segment, ACM-W OSU Chapter Co-President, Emily explains the importance of having a formal Mission Statement for your club. A mission statement will help you explain why your ACM-W Student Chapter exists and how it will function. It will inspire you and provide guidance to your members. Having a mission statement helps you recruit members, create community, foster corporation relations, and raise funds for activities.

Does your chapter have a Mission Statement? How did you create it? And how does it help drive your club’s activities?

Let us know by interacting with us on Twitter, Mastodon or Facebook. Use #BuildYourACMWChapter and our handle @OfficialACMW Want to know more about how to start an ACM-W Student Chapter at your school? Here’s the quick-start guide.

This series continues. Please read the other tips in this series:

  1. Mission Statement
  2. Goal Setting
  3. Executive Board
  4. Event Planning
  5. Member Recruiting
  6. Funding
  7. Company Relationships
  8. Community Involvement
  9. Sustainability